Top 10 French White Wines

France is popular for its rich cuisine and its cuisine wouldn’t be complete without its complementary wines. Now here are top ten French white wines for those out there who prefer fish, seafood, or fowl over red meat dishes.

1. Laurent Perrier Ultra Brut NV

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Price: $32.99
Champagne is one of the most popular drinks you will most often find in parties. Now this one has rich tones of peach stones, orange blossoms, and lemon zest with a hint of almonds. This lively wine would complement pescetarian dishes really well.

2. Le Meurger Bourgogne Chardonnay 2008

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Price: $18.99
Burgundy is a place that’s famous not only for its Pinot noir grapes but also for its Chardonnay. So knowing that this bottle came from there could only mean good things for anyone who gets their hands on this. This wine has hints of cinnamon, honey, butter, and nuts. It would complement risotto and pasta dishes.

3. Chateau Ste. Michelle & Dr. Loosen Eroica Riesling 2006

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Price: $15.99
This wine was made from Riesling grapes and has subtles traces of sweet melon, peach, and honeysuckle. It is a popular vintage because it is just lively and sweet enough for an entire dinner. It would complement a variety of chicken dishes quite well.

4. Domaine de Bellivière Jasnières les Rosiers 2004

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Price: $29.99
This bottle was made from Chenin Blanc grapes, a not so popular variety. It has hints of tropical fruits such as pineapples or guava but has obvious traces of other flavors such as honey, marzipan, peach, and quince jelly. It would complement grilled or spicy fish, or other seafood dishes.

5. Château Le Grand Verdus Ct-6 Bordeaux Blanc Aoc 2007

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Price: $23.63
This white wine from the Bordeaux region has rich traces of reserved fruits and could be excellent for cooking. It also tastes a bit lush and a tad sweet on the tongue. It would go well with creamy pasta and rice dishes.

6. Paul Blanck Gewürztraminer Alsace Altenbourg 2000

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Price: $15.00
This bottle of of white wine was made with Gewürztraminer grapes from the Alsace region of France. It has traces of very ripe fruits and could have hints of lychees. It also has roses, passion fruit, and other sweet floral aromas. It would complement any fowl dishes particularly ones with turkey or chicken meat.

7. Château Puysserguier, Saint Chinian White, 2008

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Price: $19.74
This bottle is a blend of Grencache Blanc, Maranne, and Vermentino grapes. It has subtle hints of honey and spice , and acacia flowers. This wine would complement vegetable or pasta dishes quite well.

8. Picpoul de Pinet, Fougeray de Beauclair 2007

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Price: $8.93
This wine from the Burgundy region of France was made with Picpoul (or Piquepoul) blanc grapes. It has subtle traces of nuts, cinammon, dry herbs and spice, and even ripe orchard fruits. It goes well with fish and shellfish dishes.

9. Cote Tariquet Vin de Pays des CĂ´tes de Gascogne 2007

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Price: $7.99
This table wine is a blend of a variety of Chardonnay grapes from Armagnac region of France. It is filled with the taste of rich tropical fruits and is a good complementary wine for vegetable or rice dishes.

10. Domaine Josmeyer Mise du Printemps Pinot Blanc Alsace 2008

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Price: $4.99
This bottle is full of rich white fruits and beautiful grape and peardrop aromas. It would complement seafood dishes, particularly shrimp, or a plate of spicy tomato salad.

So, are you convinced yet that white wine could be as great for dinner as the red? You should try whipping your favorite fish or chicken dishes today, pick up a bottle of white wine to go with it, and be surprised by how good the combo is. Bon appetit!

Dill and Butter Sauces

A proper sauce is an indispensable addition served with French appetizers, salads, and main courses. Various types of French mayonnaises and marinades feature raw or gently heated ingredients and add valuable enzymes and a heavenly taste to vegetables, meats, and fish dishes.

Creamy Dill Sauce:

This refreshing sauce goes wonderfully with cold roast beef, poached salmon, cold cooked ham, or salmon mousse. Beat 1 egg and combine with 1 tbsp grated onion, 4 tbsp lemon juice, 4 tbsp finely chopped dill, 1 tsp sea salt, 1/4 tsp pepper, and 1 cup crème fraîche or piima cream. Check for seasonings and add more salt, pepper, or lemon juice, if desired. Serve immediately.

Beurre Blanc (Butter Sauce):

This is a classic French sauce served with fish dishes. Place in a small pan 6 tbsp minced shallots, 6 tbsp dry white wine, and 2 tbsp fresh lemon juice. Bring to boil and reduce to about 2 tbsp. Piece after piece, add 1/2 cup butter cut into small cubes, whisking thoroughly after each addition. Sauce should thicken and become frothy. As soon as all butter has been melted, remove the sauce from the heat and season to taste with salt and pepper. Serve right away with cold or hot fish.

Béarnaise Sauce:

This wonderful sauce is a great complement to grilled meats or fish. The taste is fantastic, but making it requires some mastering. In a small saucepan, combine 2 tbsp finely chopped shallots or green onions, 1 tbsp finely chopped fresh or dried tarragon, and 2 tbsp each of white wine vinegar and white wine or vermouth. Bring to boil and reduce to about 1 tbsp. Piece after piece, add 1/2 cup butter cut into small cubes, whisking constantly until all butter has been melted. Slowly, drop by drop, add 5 beaten eggs yolks, whisking the sauce constantly until it has thickened. Remove from the heat and add a bit of fresh lemon juice and a pinch of salt and pepper. Serve warm.

French Sorrel

French sorrel (Rumex Scutatus), a mildly acidic cultivated green herb, has always been praised throughout Europe, especially in France where it enjoys its greatest popularity. It is a very ancient herb; its name is derived from the Teutonic word for “sour”. Ancient species of sorrel were extensively used in pharaonic Egypt and its allied type, garden sorrel, is still employed in modern Egyptian cooking. The ancient Greeks and Romans respected the herb for its role in promoting digestion and considered it a good complement to rich, fatty meals.To store, put French sorrel into a sealed plastic bag and keep in the refrigerator. Sorrel does not dry well, but it can be frozen successfully. Its leaves, rich in potassium and vitamins C and A, will keep its beneficial qualities and great taste for a long time, but they are especially good when fresh.

In cooking, sorrel is generally pureed and can be a perfect base for sauces that accompany poached eggs and fish. This herb is also used in mixed green salads, sandwiches, omelettes, and with soft goat cheeses, veal, pork, and fish. Be careful to cut it only with stainless steel knives and refrain from cooking it in metal pots, because the high acidity of sorrel causes them to discolour. In modern French cuisine, this herb is most notably used to prepare the three popular dishes: sorrel soup, salmon with sorrel sauce, or “saumon a l’oseille”, and

veal stew with sorrel:

Heat 4 tsp of olive oil and butter in a heavy skillet, add about 1 kg of cubed boneless veal (in small batches), sauté over low heat until golden, and transfer to a casserole pot. In the same skillet, sauté 2 finely chopped onions and about 250 gm mushrooms until they are tender. Transfer to the casserole pot with 1 cup each of home-made chicken stock and dry white wine and add bouquet garni (a French term for a bundle of herbs, usually, parsley, thyme, and a bay leaf) and salt and pepper to taste. Cover and simmer for about 2 hours, until the veal is tender. Transfer the veal cubes to a serving dish. Remove the bouquet garni. Reduce the cooking liquid by rapid boiling, stir in chopped French sorrel (about 250 gm), and cook until soft, for about 10 min. Pour over the veal and serve with white rice and a glass of red Burgundy wine. Enjoy!